The players in the Strategic Triad game take on roles as key planners and strategists of the cold war strategic nuclear arsenals.

Each player has a personal briefing that sets objectives and provides key background information relevant to their role, and the players take decisions, interact with other players, and deploy resources under their control.  The experienced Past Perspectives Game Control team then adjudicate results and provide realistic feedback on the player decisions. The game examines how changes in technology and geopolitics influence thinking and planning.

Here is an example of how Strategic Triad might be organised for a 20 participant event - with some description of the various roles. There are eight teams of participants usually divided up randomly to discourage cliques and organisational hierarchical issues (though they inevitably arise). Alternatively, the teams could be organised around departments or workgroup teams if the client prefers.

Strategic Triad has a strong emphasis on strategic thinking and policy planning - this simulates the development of strategy over a 45-year period, so the long term effects of forward thinking can be seen.

Team Role / Activity in the game Team benefits

1. USA Military Planners - comprising:

a. Missile Forces
(3 people)

b. Army
(2 people)

c. Air Force
3 people)

d. Navy
(2 people)

Developing plans for the use of forces under your command. Each sub-team has its own agenda for the development of its forces.

Bidding for funding to develop the arm of service - they have to convince their political masters that their arm deserves increased spending.

They also have to recommend how much needs to be spent on intelligence, command, control and communications.

The planners also have to work together to develop a 'posture' for their forces based on their capability and the suspected capability of their enemies. This has to be based on an assessment of the threat and risk.

Decide how much needs to be spent on technological development to maintain (or gain) an 'edge'.

Forward strategic planning and setting policy.

Making a competitive case for funding.

Offering coherent policy options for political decision makers.

Reaching consensus decisions in a competitive environment.

2. Soviet Union Military Planners - comprising:

a. Missile Forces
(2 people)

b. Army
(3 people)

c. Air Force
(3 people)

d. Navy
(2 people)

As above.

The Soviet teams are organised slightly differently to reflect the greater importance of the Army in their military system.

As above.

 

 

© Past Perspectives 2014